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This month the all-new Mercedes GLC was met by various automotive publications: Car And Driver, AutoWeek, MotorTrend, Road And Track and AutoGuide being just some that got the invite from Mercedes.

As a result from the feedback these publications shared so far, below you'll find 5 things they raved about, some being the GLC's strongest points and will likely be on the top of your list for reasons why you bought one.



"The GLC’s Interior Is A Cut Above Anything Else In The Segment Right Now"

A spitting image of the C-class cabin we love so much, the GLC’s interior is a cut above anything else in the segment right now, and the materials, detailing, and finish all put the GLK’s to shame. The seats are supremely comfortable, and the interior is hushed even at autobahn speeds. So it’s a little bit surprising that the GLC300 will start at $39,875, just $1050 more than last year’s GLK, especially considering it adds a pile of standard equipment that includes a 7.0-inch infotainment screen with touch-pad writing surface, a power liftgate, push-button start, a power driver’s seat, and collision-mitigation tech, among other bits.
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"The 2.0-Liter Turbo Is Lively Enough In A Vehicle Approaching 4,000 Pounds"

What's it like to drive?

We drove less powerful, Euro-spec GLCs and that complicates things. All signs are positive, nonetheless.

The 2016 GLC probably won’t be as quick as the GLK350 -- at least until the hybrid arrives in a couple of years. Exactly how probably is hard to say with conviction, because the GLCs in North America will have at least 30 horsepower and 25 lb-ft more than the Euro models Mercedes offered for evaluation. And while the decrease in full-throttle acceleration rate counts for something, it’s the only place the ’15 GLK has any kind of an edge on the new GLC.

Remember: Mercedes expects a 15-20 percent increase in mileage ratings when the GLC debuts on this side of the Atlantic, compared to the GLK, and maximum braked towing capacity is still a substantial 5,300 pounds. Nor are we suggesting the 2.0-liter turbo is disappointing. It’s less meaty than the GLK’s 3.5-liter V6, and not as smooth when it’s wound up, but it’s lively enough in a vehicle approaching 4,000 pounds. Peak torque should match the GLK V6. All 273 lb-ft are available over a mid-range swath of nearly 3,000 rpm, and the nine-speed automatic takes full advantage.

The four-cylinder turbodiesel following in a year is a little torque monster. By the noise inside the GLC, you can never be sure if it’s a diesel or not. The only way to know is standing next to the vehicle when it’s idling. It’s a great engine for just getting around, and with the nine-speed tuned for short shifts, surprisingly responsive. Mercedes seems to be sorting the 9G-Tronic more thoroughly as it goes, in terms of gear selection or throttle reaction. There are definite, useful changes in operation when the control program is switched from eco to sport.

The same applies throughout the vehicle. Wheel damping firms up and steering thickens in sport or sport-plus, and the ride/handling trade-off is more effectively managed than in the conventional-suspension GLK. The optional air suspension goes even further by better managing body roll without significantly stiffening the ride. It also lowers the GLC for easier boarding and loading when it’s parked.
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"GLC Is Completely Over-Engineered"

Mercedes-Benz has a reputation for overengineering its vehicles. For example, the E63 AMG S Wagon is capable of accelerating from 0 to 60 mph in 3.4 seconds and reaching 186 mph, and yet most drivers will spend their days tooling around Beverly Hills at 2 mph. The G-Wagen was designed for military use and yet most civilians will never leave peaceful tarmac. As I found out in Switzerland, Germany, and France, the brand-new 2016 Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class crossover is the latest in a long line of overengineered Mercedes vehicles.
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"You Will Enjoy The Drive, Whether It's Two Lanes Of Crazed Mountain-Pass Blacktop or The Evening Commute"

You will enjoy the drive, whether it's two lanes of crazed mountain-pass blacktop or the evening commute. The GLC's handling is understated, comfortable, but still engaging and balanced. There's body roll, but not too much, and there's even a fair amount of steering feel. Use the "Individual" setting on the driving dynamics adjuster to pick a sporty powertrain setting, leave the suspension in comfort, and enjoy one of the best all-around street-vehicle setups I've driven in years.

And that's before you get to the fact that you can equip your GLC with the semi-autonomous technology collection known as Distronic Plus. The system can steer, brake, maintain following distance, and even handle stop-and-go traffic for you—all you need to do is maintain a modicum of attention. Perfect for enjoying the time, rather than sending your already hypertensive system into full-blown apoplexy every night.
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"Photos Don’t Do It Justice; It Looks So Much More Handsome In Person."

Here’s what Mercedes said about the GLC’s new look in a press release: “The design philosophy behind the new GLC essentially favors sensual purity and a modern aesthetic over the classic off-road look.”

That’s all a load of crap. “Sensual purity?” Come on. I liked the off-road look.

I love boxy cars, so I was a fan of the first-gen GLK. Reminding me of a smaller, more attainable G-Wagen, the boxy GLK was unique. Maybe I’m just a hipster that likes old things that don’t fit into the mainstream, fine. But one of the GLK’s strongest selling points for me was its boxy looks; it made the GLK look more rugged and helped it stand out in a very crowded segment.

As much as I’m not a huge fan of the more mainstream looks, I can’t help but agree that its new style will only help its sales. And although it’s no longer boxy, the GLC is still a handsome SUV. It has all the right proportions and immediately stands out as something luxurious and with sporty intentions. It definitely looks fresher, sleeker and more aggressive than its bubbly BMW X3 and conservative, aging Audi Q5 competition. Photos don’t do it justice; it looks so much more handsome in person.
 

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I will agree that the interior is really nice. I don't see any other brand with something quite this nice. That should actually go a long way to making the GLC successful. Most of the time you are experiencing the car from the inside so that is the most important part in some ways. Love the centre stack.
 

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I will agree that the interior is really nice. I don't see any other brand with something quite this nice. That should actually go a long way to making the GLC successful. Most of the time you are experiencing the car from the inside so that is the most important part in some ways. Love the centre stack.
Across just about every segment they have been dominating in design by of course... the same design language. I just wish the front end was just as aggressive as the rear end is.
 
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